Kite Line is a weekly radio program and podcast that focuses on issues in the prison system and beyond.

On the inside, a message is called a kite: whispered words, a note passed hand to hand, or a request submitted to guards for medical care. 

Illicit or not, sending a kite means trusting that other people will pass it farther along, until it reaches its destination. 

We make this show to pass along words, across the prison walls

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Recent Episodes

255 | Marius Mason and Eric King

Our show this week returns to June 11th, the international day of solidarity with long-term anarchist prisoners. The focus of June 11th is overcoming the isolation that these long-term prisoners face, as the movements they participated in years ago give way to new struggles and new generations of radicals.  The day of solidarity works to connect these prisoners with struggles currently underway, especially those struggles with the potential to abolish the prison system, freeing them and all prisoners. We begin with Letha, who gives us an update on Marius Mason, who alongside most

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254 | Ongoing Threats to Eric King

We start off this week’s show with a roundup of prison disturbances compiled by Perilous Chronicle.  Afterwards, we speak with Lauren Regan, the Executive Director of the Civil Liberties Defense Center. Regan has been on the show before to discuss state repression and her efforts to support people facing political charges.  She returns today to talk about the CLDC and specifically Eric King, an anarchist prisoner housed at FCI Englewood in Colorado. King was arrested in 2014 after he carried out an attack against a politician’s office in solidarity with the Ferguson uprising. 

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253 | Truth Never Dies

This week, we hear from Koby Bluitt, daughter of Leon Benson, a long time Indiana prisoner and organizer. She tells us about Leon, their relationship, and her current efforts to help him get free. We’ve covered Leon’s case on Kite Line before: a case of poor eyewitness testimony that helped convict the man of a crime he adamantly maintains he did not commit. Koby tells us about how Leon has been spending his 23 years inside, and what it was like having a parent in prison. She closes with advice for those who have a loved

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252 | Advice on Confinement and Release

This week, we share two stories from people reflecting on their time inside and on re-entry. Both have wise words about surviving incarceration, and the overall political context of prisons. First is David Campbell, a former political prisoner at Rikers Island in New York. We will hear more from David later, but in this episode, he discusses his case and sentencing, the rigors of cell searches, and how he organized his time inside. Next, we hear from Spirit Mike, who endured a decade in the Florida prison system. In particular, Mike thinks about the broader systems

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251 | Parole Illinois, Part Two

Last week, we heard from Kim, Shari, Lauren, Pablo and Brian about Parole Illinois, a group fighting to reinstate, as they put it, “earned discretionary reentry”. This is the last of a two-part conversation with them. In 1978, Illinois abolished discretionary parole system. Today, it remains one of just sixteen states (plus the District of Columbia) without any means for incarcerated people to earn parole. In the previous episode, they introduced themselves and their own connections to incarceration- a couple of them have loved ones locked inside, or have been inside themselves.

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250 | Parole Illinois, Part One

We start this episode with our monthly list of prison disturbances compiled by Perilous Chronicle, an journalistic collective that tracks prisoner protests across the US and Canada. Afterwards, we share the first part of a conversation with people working with Parole Illinois, a group campaigning for a fair and inclusive parole system. In 1978, Illinois abolished discretionary parole system. Today, it remains one of just sixteen states (plus the District of Columbia) without any means for incarcerated people to earn parole. In this episode, we will hear first hand about the impacts of

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